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20130120
20130120
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
the president views this -- he is really -- he sees himself as the protector in chief and that's true on foreign policy and it's true on domestic -- >> he clearly seems to have been personally affected, matthew dowd, by the newtown tragedy, but how much -- if you were advising him, how much should he invest in this at the beginning of what is a packed second term? >> he definitely was affected by it. every american was affected by what happened in that awful situation. i mean the president could have done a lot of this in the last four years which he chose not to do. he could have done a bunch on executive orders and decisions he chose not to because he understood the political problem with this. to me this whole issue -- i live in austin, texas, and texas is a place where people love their guns. i have five -- owned five guns. most people know something has to be done. most people know there has to be something done. how far does it is extended is a question of debate. something will get passed -- but i'm just -- >> before that, my fear is the real thing that won't get done is what the real iss
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)